Your reliability can make an impact

Right now I’m in a teaching series about how to be a person of your word in a world of verbal mistrust. [See the 50-second preview video here.]

It’s generating a lot of interesting discussions. And in today’s devotional, I’d like to dig into something I’ll be talking a little bit more about this coming Sunday on November 25th.

It’s about how being a person of your word helps the people around you. In fact, when you are steady for other people when they’re going through a tough time, that stabilizing impact can last for generations.

Not many people know Don Sutton. But he was a pro baseball player for 21 seasons. He wasn’t flashy. But in 1986 he became one of only 13 pitchers to win 300 games.

“I never considered myself flamboyant or exceptional,” he said. “But all my life I’ve found a way to get the job done.” As a result he’s been called the “family sedan” of baseball pitchers.

Others would come and go. But Sutton persisted.

That could be you.

You may not be flashy. But if you are a person who is counted as trustworthy, as someone who consistently keeps their word to other people, you can be that steadfast person in someone else’s life when times get tough.

Your reliability is someone else’s stability.

In Galatians 6:9 Paul writes, “Let us not become weary in doing good…” Don’t be weary. Instead, be reliable and steadfast in the good you bring into other people’s lives—consistently.

You don’t have to be an All Star. But you can be consistent.

Your reliability is someone else’s stability.

By Matthew Ruttan

Click here to learn about what’s coming up This Sunday at Westminster.
-“Up!” is published 5 days a week (Monday to Friday) and returns on November 26th.
-Have you ordered your copy of the “Up!” book yet? Learn more here.
-Bible quotes are from the New International Version.
-The story of Don Sutton is told in God Came Near by Max Lucado.

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