Lose the guilt

Philippians 2:3-4
“Do nothing out of selfish ambition or vain conceit. Rather, in humility value others above yourselves, not looking to your own interests but each of you to the interests of the others.” (NIV)

Today’s Thought
There are certain bible passages that, to me, are like the mail carrier. They just keep coming back. And every time they do, they deliver something else to open up and think about.

One of those passages is Philippians 2:3-4: “Do nothing out of selfish ambition or vain conceit. Rather, in humility value others above yourselves, not looking to your own interests but each of you to the interests of the others.”

I agree with that statement 100%. I also struggle with that statement 100%!

“Value others above yourselves.” The person who wrote that passage, Paul, didn’t say “value others in a round-about way.” Nor did he say, “value others just when you’re having a good day and want to be a sweetie.”

He said that it should be done “not looking to your own interests but each of you to the interests of the others.”

So here’s one way I think all of us can “value others above yourselves.”

Lose the guilt.

Guilt is an emotional tool we use to get people to think like we do. And by my count, that’s not a very good way to “value others above yourselves.” When we truly value people, we think about their own interests, treat them with respect, speak plainly, and act out of love and not spite.

How does it make you feel when someone gives you a guilt trip? My guess is that you get your back up and want to either shout at them or leave the room. Well, I’m guessing that’s how people feel when you marshal the guilt guns and blast away!

Guilt trips are often permission slips for people to leave a conversation. And it’s hard to build relationships and encourage one another when you’re no longer talking.

Today, “value others above yourselves,” and don’t just use guilt as a way to get people to think like you do.

Instead, think about their interests, treat them with respect, speak plainly, and act out of love and not spite.

Guilt trips are often permission slips for people to leave a conversation.

By Matthew Ruttan

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