For those who think they’re “normal”

It’s waayyy too easy to erase ourselves from God’s equation. That’s what we pretend to do when we say or think something like this:

“God is so huge and extraordinary. But my life is just so… small and normal.”

Granted, I kind of get where that comes from. Thinking about the utter bigness of the universe, astronomer Carl Sagan concluded, “Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.”

If I had that perspective, maybe I’d also think that my life was small and normal… and pointless!

But I don’t. And I don’t think you should either.

Our world and our lives are TEEMING with design and purpose. In Psalm 139:13-14 we read, “For you [God] knit me together in my mother’s womb. I praise you because I am fearfully and wonderfully made.”

From birth to death and beyond, God is actively at work in your life, inviting you with a divine summons to be a part of the ways he is renovating the world so that it looks more like heaven.

The opposite of normal isn’t extraordinary—it’s purpose.

People who are confident that they are a part of the ways God is renovating the world with his goodness can never be “normal.”

Normal is what happens when you give up.
Normal is what happens when you give in.
Normal is what happens when you don’t know Jesus.

Bringing your integrity to the workplace isn’t “normal.” Investing time and grace in the people who live with you isn’t “normal.” Standing up for those who are hurting isn’t “normal.” Volunteering to bless others isn’t “normal.”

These are the kinds of things people do who live on purpose with purpose.

So take heart. God made you. And as it said on a t-shirt my grandma made me when I was 7, “God don’t make no junk.”

Today, no matter what’s happening in your life, take hold of that purpose and inject some of God’s goodness into what you say and do.

The opposite of normal isn’t extraordinary—it’s purpose.

By Matthew Ruttan

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