Did Jesus trust the Scriptures?

Last week I highlighted how some people struggle to understand the Bible. Because of that I encouraged you to (a) get a translation in modern English, and (b) buy a good study Bible.

But if we’re honest, I think one of the reasons we stall in our reading is because we aren’t really convinced it’s an authoritative message from God for our lives.

To convince you, I could talk about passages like 2 Timothy 3:16 that say “All Scripture is God-breathed…” But I won’t.

I could also talk about the reliability of the manuscript tradition or the incredible impact the Bible has had on civilization from the pursuit of health care, education, and human rights to poverty reduction. But I won’t.

Instead, let me just say this: Jesus himself considered the Scriptures to be authoritative and from God.

When Jesus was tempted by Satan in the wilderness he responded by quoting from Scripture (Matthew 4: 1-11). Several other places he appeals to its authority by saying “as it is written,” which is the ancient equivalent of saying, “the Bible says…” He consistently quotes the Scriptures to settle disputes. In Mark 7:1-13 he quotes the biblical teachings through Moses and calls them the “word of God” and “the commands of God.” (I could go on.)

The Saviour trusted the Scriptures.

In the Gospels, Jesus commissions the apostles to continue his work and teaching throughout the world. Many of the New Testament writings are partly a result of that commission from Jesus himself. In John 14 and 15 he even prayed that the Holy Spirit would help the apostles remember everything he had taught them.

Friends, brothers and sisters, if you’re needing some New Year motivation to sink deep into the pages of God’s wisdom, remember this: Jesus himself considered the Scriptures to be authoritative and from God.

The Saviour trusted the Scriptures.

And so can you.

By Matthew Ruttan

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