The privilege to worship the newborn King

Last week I visited someone who’s had a lot of challenges in the past year. Let’s call him Jake.

Jake was sad because for the first time ever he won’t be able to go to a Christmas Eve service. Physically, he just can’t do it.

How many of us can do it—quite easily, actually—and therefore, take it for granted?

In fact, we can even sometimes think it’s a hassle (instead of a privilege) to worship God at church, attend events with family or friends, or make an effort to help those who are struggling.

But actually, we get to worship God, we get to attend events with family or friends, we get to help those who are struggling.

Mary and Joseph traveled roughly 90 MILES to get to Bethlehem. The wise men traveled an INSANE distance over inhospitable territory to see the newborn King. And then, when they arrived, “they saw the child with his mother Mary, and they bowed down and worshiped him” (Matthew 2:11).

They worshiped the newborn King, not because there was nothing better to do, but because they couldn’t bear to do anything else.

To quote one of the songs we’ll sing at our 7pm service tonight:

“Oh come, all ye faithful,
joyful and triumphant;
oh come ye, oh come ye to Bethlehem.
Come and behold him,
born the King of angels:
Oh come, let us adore him…
Christ the Lord.”*

Jake can’t be there tonight. But many of us can be, wherever we happen to live.

If possible, let’s worship the newborn King, not because there is nothing better to do, but because we can’t bear to do anything else.

By Matthew Ruttan

–If you’re looking for a church home on Christmas Eve you’re invited to Westminster in Barrie! We have a 5:30-6:05pm super family-friendly service, and a traditional candlelit service from 7-8pm.

When Christmas is the (least) wonderful time of the year. That’s an article I wrote which appeared yesterday in The Toronto Star. You can read it here. Enjoy! (And have a meaningful Christmas.)

–Bible quotes are from the NIV.

–*Words to “Oh come all ye faithful”: Latin, John Francis Wade (1711-1786); translation, F. Oakeley (1802-1880). Words: public domain

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