The polarizing internet

The internet has a polarizing effect.

Recently a well-respected Christian organization posted a blog. Since it touched on the topic of politics, the comments came fast and furious. (Apparently, politics can be a touchy subject these days. Have you noticed?)

Unfortunately, the comments were highly charged, accusatory, derogatory, and unfair.

Have you noticed how quickly that can happen online?

When we can’t see each other’s faces (and therefore forget that we’re interacting with actual human beings), and when we can post comments instantly (instead of taking that sober second thought), the results are often unbecoming of God’s people.

But something else can happen too—something deeper, almost unnoticeable. It’s a powerful urge—a sinful urge—to always want to be right, and for others to acknowledge that you’re right; that you’re the winner and that other people should grovel and bow at your untainted feet of undisputed knowledge.

Paul’s advice to Titus is good for all of us: “Remind the people… to slander no one, to be peaceable and considerate, and always to be gentle toward everyone” (Titus 3:1-2).

Online words are still words. Who you are online is still a part of who you are.

The world doesn’t need more people who have to be right—but sincere apprentices of Jesus who want to live in the right way.

By Matthew Ruttan

It’s a tough time of year, isn’t it? Hold on a second. It’s been a tough YEAR! That’s why at Westminster we’re hosting a special live-streamed “Service of Comfort” this Thursday evening (Dec 17, 2020) at 7pm. We’ll sing, pray, talk about how to be well, and generally seek God’s comfort and encouragement. You can watch it here.

Faith Today is Canada’s Christian Magazine. Today they published an article I wrote along with the Rev. Dr. Richard Topping, the Principal of the Vancouver School of Theology. It’s called “A Motto for a Pandemic” (previously published on MatthewRuttan.com). You can check it out—and hopefully be grounded and encouraged—here!

–Bible quotes are from the NIV.

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