Blind to our own blind spots

“Hey there, old buddy old pal! How are you today? Would you mind giving me some criticism? What about some constructive-but-very-honest feedback about what I could do to improve myself?”

Okay, you’re right. Conversations don’t usually start that way. In fact, we tend to dislike criticism or feedback about how we can “improve ourselves.” Not always, but often. Even criticism that is intended to be loving and constructive can be poorly received.

And yet, if we want to grow in wisdom, humility, strength and faithfulness, we could all probably benefit from the input of other trusted people.

The reason it can be helpful is because “we’re all blind to our own blind spots.”* So says Mark Driscoll. He’s right. If they weren’t blind spots we’d be able to see them!

Consider Proverbs 27:6: “Wounds from a friend can be trusted…” That’s a piercing statement. Aren’t wounds bad? Usually. But when a friend offers a loving word of correction or criticism, it is something that can be trusted. They’re most likely showing they care because they want what’s best for you.

Do you want to genuinely grow in wisdom, humility, strength and faithfulness? Maybe you should find a trusted friend and ask them to identify what might be blind spots in your character.

“Wounds from a friend can be trusted.”


Notes:

–Podcast and blog: “A closer look at the nativity in Luke 2:1-20: politics, fear, subversion, war and hope.” If you want to go deeper with this historic (and surprising) story; this is for you. Click here or subscribe to ‘The Pulse Podcast with Matthew Ruttan’ on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn, Audible or Amazon Music.

–Are you looking for a place to worship on Christmas Eve? Click here for what’s happening at Westminster in Barrie, Canada.

–*As quoted at The Most Excellent Way to Lead Conference, March 3, 2016.

–Bible quotes are from the NIV.

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