Not just what you say, but how

I’ve spoken with dozens of people looking for advice about how to speak more confidently about their faith—more specifically, to those who don’t share that same faith.

Jesus is very special to us. So we want to speak of him well, and to say something that is compelling to others. This can be especially hard when we feel under attack, or when we feel like we’re not very good at talking—even on the best of days!

In Colossians 4:6 (and under the inspiration of God’s Spirit!) Paul gives this guidance: “Let your conversation be always full of grace, seasoned with salt, so that you may know how to answer everyone.”

It’s a word about HOW you say what you say, not just WHAT you say.

First, he says that your conversation should be “always full of grace.” Not sometimes, but always. To be “full of grace” is to be exceedingly generous, even if the other person hasn’t done anything to deserve your generosity.

Second, he says to be “seasoned with salt.” In the ancient world, salt served a few different functions, one of which was to be a preservative. In this sense, we are to preserve godliness in our conversations. Our words should try to share a taste of Christ.

This is the “how” of our conversations.

Let me just put this out there: In many ways, good conversation—and I mean conversation that is truly good (whether in person or online)—is headed down the toilet in our time. Fortunately, we are not obliged to go with the flow!

It’s not just about what you say, but how you say it.


Notes:

–The Up Devotional is published 5 days a week (Monday-Friday) and returns on April 12, 2021.

–Do you LISTEN to The Up Devotional as a podcast on iTunes (Apple), Spotify, Google Podcasts, or Stitcher? If so, it would be great if you rate and leave a quick review. It really does help get the word out. Thanks!

–Bible quotes are from the NIV.

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